The Lienzo de Quauhquechollan

The Lienzo de Quauhquechollan exhibition

The Lienzo de Quauhquechollan is a pictographic painting on cotton cloth, created circa 1530. The Lienzo is considered the first map of Guatemala.

Learn more about the exhibition

Maya Meetings

Highlighted News and Events

The Art History Collection: hidden objects

moche art collection
Featured in the new book "The Collections" by UT Press: Item #180, Modeled human forearm & leg, Peru, Moche, Early Intermediate

Beyond the galleries, deep behind the closed doors of UT’s hallowed halls, you might stumble upon hidden brains. Or vintage Chanel. Or an eggbeater patented in 1868.

“The secret life of objects at UT,” Andrée Bober calls it, and she should know: She’s spent the last 11 years sifting through 170 million of them.

Director of UT’s Landmarks public art program by day, author and artifact wrangler by night, Bober is the editor of The Collections, a first-of-its-kind sweeping guide to 80 fascinating collections and archives found across the Forty Acres. Often tucked away from the public eye, their holdings feature irreplaceable relics and specimens radical in range—from the Gutenberg Bible to freshwater algae samples to the emerald green curtain dress worn by Scarlett O’Hara in Gone with the Wind.

 The Alcalde article: The Collections

From the Archives


 

In 1978, this 56-page booklet, the original “notebook” for the Maya Hieroglyphic Writing Workshop at Texas, was handed out to all participants and contained Linda Schele’s detailed transcriptions of selected hieroglyphic tablets from Palenque, Mexico.

This initial gathering, held over a chilly spring break in Austin, was the distant ancestor of the current Maya Meetings and has been held annually ever since.