News

Fall 2017 Newsletter

Catherine Popovici

Read about all of the activities and programs we took on in the 2016-2017 academic year, and what to expect of 2017-2018.

2017 Maya Meetings pave way for broader Mesoamerica shift

This is a photo of a slide showing the theme of this year's Mesoamerica Meetings

The 2017 Maya Meetings, “Tlillan Tlapallan: The Maya as Neighbors in Ancient Mesoamerica,” took place at UT Austin from January 10-14, combining interactive workshops and stimulating

A New Era for Our Annual Meetings

 

Schele drawing of Palenque Palace Tablet detail
Schele drawing of Palenque Palace Tablet detail

Forty years ago, in 1978, UT Austin hosted the first Maya Hieroglyphic Workshop by Linda Schele, and an institution was born. Over the years the annual event grew as an open and vibrant gathering of scholars, students and others, sharing in the newest research in (mostly) Maya art, archaeology and related disciplines. 2018 brings exciting new changes, marking not only the beginning of our third k’atun, but also our new identity as the UT Mesoamerica Meetings, emphasizing the interconnectedness of all Mesoamerican cultures. Read more about the history of the Meetings in our About page.

To celebrate our anniversary and our new direction, we will devote our 2018 conference to a novel topic: Mesoamerican Philosophies: Animate Matter, Metaphysics, and the Natural Environment. View our open call for submissions here and stay tuned for our schedule and registration page in fall 2017.

New Mesoamerica Meetings logo
 

Ruta Maya Coffee Sponsors The Maya Meetings

Ruta Maya Coffee

We are proud to announce the wonderful news that Ruta Maya Coffee Company has once again offered its support for The Mesoamerica Center and the 2017 Maya Meetings! We have an impressive line-up of workshops and symposium talks, made possible by the endorsement of Ruta Maya Coffee. We are thankful for our Austin neighbors who brings us coffee from the lands of Mesoamerica, and support our Maya Meetings programs for scholarly and public audiences. 

The Art History Collection: hidden objects

moche art collection
Featured in the new book "The Collections" by UT Press: Item #180, Modeled human forearm & leg, Peru, Moche, Early Intermediate

Beyond the galleries, deep behind the closed doors of UT’s hallowed halls, you might stumble upon hidden brains. Or vintage Chanel. Or an eggbeater patented in 1868.

“The secret life of objects at UT,” Andrée Bober calls it, and she should know: She’s spent the last 11 years sifting through 170 million of them.

Director of UT’s Landmarks public art program by day, author and artifact wrangler by night, Bober is the editor of The Collections, a first-of-its-kind sweeping guide to 80 fascinating collections and archives found across the Forty Acres. Often tucked away from the public eye, their holdings feature irreplaceable relics and specimens radical in range—from the Gutenberg Bible to freshwater algae samples to the emerald green curtain dress worn by Scarlett O’Hara in Gone with the Wind.

 The Alcalde article: The Collections

The Mesoamerica Center receives support from Ruta Maya Coffee

Ruta Maya Coffee
 

The Mesoamerica Center housed in the Department of Art and Art History at The University of Texas at Austin is proud to announce a new partnership with Ruta Maya Coffee.

“The Maya Meetings and Ruta Maya Coffee are two Austin institutions with strong ties in the Maya world. It’s wonderful to have us working together to promote scholarship, learning and sustainability in the region,” said David Stuart, director of The Mesoamerica center and the Linda and David Schele Chair in the Art and Writing of Mesoamerica.

Ruta Maya Coffee will be partially underwriting the Maya Meetings and programs at Casa Herrera.

"We are very proud to be involved with the Mesoamerica Center at The University of Texas at Austin and to participate in The Maya Meetings and Casa Herrera. We are excited about all the possibilities as well as the bridges to be built between the Mayan Farmer Coops and the Mesoamerica Center" said Tim Sheehan, President of Ruta Maya Coffee.

Preliminary Notes on Two Recently Discovered Inscriptions from La Corona, Guatemala

La Corona Element

Archaeologists with the La Corona Regional Archaeological Project in Guatemala announced significant hieroglyphic finds during a press conference at the National Palace in Guatemala City.  Dr. David Stuart is La Corona Project main epigrapher, where the maya monument was unearth. Read Dr. Stuart article on the findings.

Notes on the recently discovered inscriptions in Guatemala.

Submit papers for The 2016 Maya Meetings

Dos Pilas

 

The 2016 Maya Meetings ( January 12-16, 2016) will explore the archaeology and history of the lower Río Pasión region, focusing on the sites of Seibal, Dos Pilas, Aguateca and others.

Research over several decades has shown this distinctive area as a key “hot spot” of turmoil during the Classic period – an area of conflict, alliance-building, and ever-changing political structure. No previous large conference has ever focused on this important area, so the presentations and discussions will be break new ground, weaving together information form archaeological projects old and new.

Following our new format, The Maya Meetings symposium now devotes time to our special theme and a will also devote time to papers touching on all aspects of Maya archaeology, culture and history. We invite submissions from anyone who is interested in presenting.

Submission page is now closed.

New releases from UT Press

book releases cover

Summer is sizzling! Check out the new and upcoming releases from The University of Texas Press. Great books to make summer a breeze!