Interns, Volunteers Contribute to Mesoamerica Center Projects

Over the course of the past year, The Mesoamerica Center welcomed several volunteers and
interns. Each student or individual contributed to projects with the center while enriching their academic experience.

Ashley Almodóvar-Suárez, a student from UT Austin’s Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies (LLILAS), worked with the Art and Art History Collection to create a digitized  version of the Fine Arts Library exhibit of pottery vessels from the Nasca, Moche, and Chimu cultures of South America. The digitization will help scholars, students, and researchers easily access information about the collection.

Adrian Gonzales, a 2017 LLILAS graduate, worked on researching, organizing, and digitizing illustrations for Dr. David Stuart’s new manuscript on the Aztec Calendar Stone. Gonzales’ contribution included seeking out permissions for the reproduction of copyrighted illustrations and helping to streamline the production of the manuscript.

Please see our article on Dr. Stuart’s new monograph, also in this newsletter, for details.

Olivia Armandroff, a recent graduate of Yale University, volunteered this summer to help organize the information associated with a set of original drawings by Merle Green Robertson. The line drawings depict sculptures of Palenque, and were used in the publication of Robertson’s three-volume text “The Sculpture of Palenque.” The drawings are in the process of becoming part of The Mesoamerica Center’s collections and archives thanks to a generous donation.

Myy Nguyen
Myy Nguyen helped to create a digital database of the Art and Art History Collection.

Muyy Nguyen began interning at The Mesoamerica Center last fall via the Bridging Disciplines Program in Museum Studies. She helped to create a digital database of the West Mexico artifacts within the Art & Art History Collectio. Nguyen returned in the spring with the Connecting Experience program, with Astrid Runggaldier as her faculty advisor, to continue her work on the database, making the collection more accessible for scholarly exploration.